Video


Analyst Ross Benes and forecasting analyst Eric Haggstrom join guest host Paul Verna to discuss the latest in subscription-based video, including the platform mix, cord-cutting, peak TV and changes in terminology.

Today’s kids are more digital than previous generations at the same age. But, while digital video is certainly an important part of kids’ media diet, we estimate that just over half of those ages 11 and younger (52.4%) will be digital video viewers this year. TV penetration is still much higher (close to nine in 10), although time spent is declining.

An increasingly important part of companies’ messaging efforts is content marketing, which they rely on to build brand awareness and engagement, provide thought leadership, and tap into cultural conversations around particular trends and topics.

Disregard talk that newest streaming service will be a “Netflix killer.” There is room for multiple streamers to succeed as consumers funnel more money to digital video subscriptions. Still, at some point, with so many streaming services entering the fray, Netflix and its competitors will have to deal with subscription fatigue. Eventually.

eMarketer analyst Ross Benes, principal analyst Andrew Lipsman and vice president of content studio Paul Verna discuss the upcoming video platform Quibi and how much it can affect the current field. They then talk about the consequences of password sharing, NBCUniveral selling ad inventory across all screens and Spotify preparing to serve podcast ads using tons of data.

eMarketer forecasting analyst Eric Haggstrom and vice president of content studio Paul Verna discuss Disney's new streaming service and whether its success will last. They then talk about NBCUniversal's Peacock video platform details, an augmented reality contact lens and why esports is coming to Imax.

eMarketer principal analyst Mark Dolliver, junior analyst Blake Droesch and vice president of content studio Paul Verna talk about CCPA's arrival, TikTok's recent security and misinformation issues, Spotify's position on political ads, Facebook's deepfake ban, Delta Air Lines's "binge button" and more.

eMarketer analyst Ross Benes talks about one thing that summed up 2019 for him and some of his predictions for 2020, focusing on the anxiety around the streaming wars.

China has proven to be a hotbed for digital innovations, especially in the past few years. During this time, marketers worldwide have observed the latest trends coming out of the country, applying what they learn to their own markets.

At the end of last year, we asked three important questions about Facebook in 2019.

eMarketer principal analyst Mark Dolliver, junior analyst Blake Droesch and vice president of content studio Paul Verna talk about Spotify's purchase of The Ringer, Disney+ reaching 28 million subscribers, Airbnb's brand issue, manipulated Twitter content, emotional Super Bowl ads, polar bears and more.

As more people watch video content on their mobile devices, the nature of mobile video monetization is changing. This is particularly the case for programmatic advertising, which we define as an automated, technology-driven method of buying, selling or fulfilling digital display ad placements. Overall, mobile video ads sold programmatically generated $19.93 billion in revenues in 2019 in the US and will generate $24.87 billion in 2020.

The role of political advertising in social media will be a key discussion topic in 2020—an easy prediction to make. Kantar Media expects that US digital political ad spending will reach $1.2 billion this year, and we believe the social platforms that continue accepting political advertisers will be major beneficiaries of that spending.

eMarketer forecasting analyst Eric Haggstrom and vice president of content studio Paul Verna discuss the biggest takeaways from Netflix's latest results. They then talk about the UK's position on a landmark EU copyright law, YouTube's latest esports move and Google's new position on its search results redesign.

eMarketer principal analyst Mark Dolliver and junior analyst Blake Droesch analyze Netflix's Q4 performance and talk about why Section 230 might get revoked, new UK child privacy rules, the fate of IGTV, the coldest temperature ever recorded and more.

eMarketer principal analyst Mark Dolliver, junior analyst Blake Droesch and vice president of content studio Paul Verna talk about what people are watching on Disney+, TikTok's latest "curated content" idea, Hulu's new ad formats, box office records, kids' allowances and more.

eMarketer analyst Ross Benes covers the latest developments on the pay TV front, including a new price hike from a vMVPD, a licensing deal between a network and traditional pay TV service, and legislation that could make life harder, and easier, for providers.

Short-form video apps arrived in China in early 2017 and have established themselves as viable entertainment options, allowing users to create content in 15- and 60-second spurts. In fact, we estimate that average daily time spent with short-form video among mobile internet users has risen from 9.9% of total mobile internet time in Q3 2018 to 13.5% in Q2 2019. Meanwhile, time spent on over-the-top (OTT) apps experienced a slight decline.

Mobile dethroned TV in 2019 as the channel where US adults spent the most time. While it may be a symbolic threshold for now, it’s still notable that the average US adult spent 3 hours, 43 minutes (3:43) on their mobile devices in 2019, compared with the average 3:35 spent watching TV. As recently as 2016, US adults watched nearly an hour more of TV than they spent on their smartphones and tablets (4:05 vs. 3:08).

eMarketer global director of public relations Douglas Clark shares our updated forecast for Netflix adoption in the UK, France and Germany.