Retail & Ecommerce


As a last-touch channel, social networks have doubled in visit share to US retail sites in the past two years. And the overwhelming majority of social referrals come from smartphones, according to Q1 2019 data from Adobe Digital Insights.

Last week, Amazon announced its latest ploy to attract and retain Prime members: An $800 million investment in one-day delivery. This expansion initiative comes when growth among its most lucrative shoppers is waning. We estimate that US Prime user growth will be less than 9% this year, vs. 12.5% in 2018.

Monthly purchases made via smart speakers rose by 5.4% year over year in the US, per January 2019 data from voice tech companies Voicebot and Voicify. However, those who shopped using voice accounted for less than one-fifth of smart speaker users.

In the latest episode of "Behind the Numbers," eMarketer principal analyst Andrew Lipsman talks about US consumers' attitudes toward loyalty programs. What do consumers want from a loyalty program? Who subscribes and who doesn’t? And what impact does it have on those who are part of a loyalty program?

In the US, almost half of marketers think they’re delivering an “excellent” customer experience, according to January 2019 research from The Harris Poll. But fewer than a quarter of consumers felt the same.

From their mailboxes to their mobile phones, shoppers look for coupons everywhere, but convenience is a must. For marketers, it’s important to provide consumers with discounts that are easy to find and use.

In 2018, total worldwide app revenues grew 63% year over year, according to app commerce company Poq. Additionally, time spent in shopping apps grew 45% from two years prior, per data from App Annie.

According to a survey from Simmons Research completed in August 2018, an average of 27.4% of parents said they were more likely to buy products they see used or recommended by friends on social sites. This is higher than one-fifth of total adult respondents who said the same.

Gen Z is a tough generation for retailers to figure out. They grew up on the internet, but don't like to be targeted with ads there, and crave authenticity in all of their interactions. We parsed the research to help retailers figure it out.

While retail ecommerce sales are growing rapidly in the US, brick-and-mortar shopping is still important to consumers. They’ll spend almost 90% of their retail dollars in person this year, and a large portion of that foot traffic comes from webrooming.

In today's "eMarketer Daily Forecast" video, forecasting analyst Eric Haggstrom tees up our numbers for retail and ecommerce sales by device. Watch now.

Younger, digitally engaged consumers love to use almost any technology that might make their buying process more self-sufficient, whereas traditional consumers are driven more by cost and ease of use.

According to a November 2018 study from AllianceData, a majority of the consumers surveyed said they want more control over email frequency and the content they receive from brands. Meanwhile, just a small number of marketers said they are meeting those needs.

This year, ecommerce is set to be 10.9% of total US retail spending—about one-eighth the size of retail brick-and-mortar. The general merchandise category will account for about 50% of total retail sales this year, and that number climbs to roughly 67% when you look at strictly online general merchandise sales.

Millennials have long been omnichannel shoppers, but their preference for digital channels is growing alongside the rise of D2C brands and mcommerce.

Last year, the number of locations offering “buy online, pick up in-store” (BOPUS) nearly doubled among leading US grocery retailers. Walmart (and various third-party partners), Target/Shipt, Kroger/Instacart, Ahold and Albertsons brought their collective number of click-and-collect locations from 2,451 in January 2018 to 5,800 in December 2018, per data from CommonSense Robotics.

Smartphone retail mcommerce sales will make up 34% of all US ecommerce sales this year, reaching $203.94 billion. While desktop purchases still dominate—amounting to $331.85 billion in 2019—they are growing at a rate of just 5.0%.

This year, we expect China’s total retail ecommerce sales will grow more than 30%, reaching nearly $2 trillion—the highest-grossing retail ecommerce market worldwide, according to our latest forecast. Behind China, the US retail ecommerce market will reach $600.63 billion in sales, growing nearly 15% year over year.

The online grocery market heats up following the news Amazon is planning to open a new line of grocery stores in locations across the US in 2019.

The online grocery market is starting to reach an inflection point, but in order to achieve success, retailers must overcome key logistical hurdles.