Media Buying

eMarketer principal analyst Nicole Perrin looks at what consumers expect to see from brands during the pandemic. She then discusses Google now allowing COVID-19 ads to run on its platforms, the T-Mobile and Sprint merger being finalized and how radio has been performing recently.

The last US recession—which lasted from December 2007 to June 2009—resulted in two straight years of US ad spending declines. As the coronavirus spreads worldwide more than a decade later, the US faces what looks like another economic downturn.

US marketers allocated more than $7 billion in digital ad spending to YouTube last year, eMarketer estimates, up 15.1% over 2018 spending levels. That resulted in more than $3.4 billion in net ad revenues for the video-sharing giant, with most of the remainder going to content creators.

The coronavirus pandemic and its effects on the economy have upended media plans. eMarketer forecasting analyst Eric Haggstrom joins host Nicole Perrin to talk about research on what advertisers are doing to respond and which channels are getting hit hardest, as well as what current developments might mean for our next US digital ad spending forecast.

According to our estimates, which were finalized prior to the coronavirus outbreak and subsequent cancellation of major sports programming, US TV ad sales were expected to climb 2.0% this year to $72.00 billion, a significant bump from 2019’s 2.5% year-over-year decline to $70.59 billion.

Mobile ad spending in the US was up 23.0% last year, we estimate, reaching $87.30 billion. That translated to just under two-thirds of all digital ad spending in the country.

The Great Recession was a low point in the recorded history of advertising. Total media ad spending declined for two straight years in the US, and digital ad spending even dropped in absolute terms in 2009, the only time that’s ever happened. But most of the buy-side decision-makers surveyed in late March 2020 by the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) think the coronavirus pandemic will have an even worse effect on US ad budgets.

Digital media and the spread of misinformation are two topics that often go hand in hand, and as the coronavirus pandemic takes hold in the UK, consumers are turning to tried and tested methods of acquiring necessary information. With a less splintered and partisan than what’s found in the US, organizations like the BBC and other traditional media continue to be the go-to sources of information for UK consumers.

eMarketer junior analyst Blake Droesch and senior analyst Jasmine Enberg discuss how COVID-19 changed social media engagement, platform advertising and influencer behavior. They then talk about TikTok's new "Transparency Center," the optimal social media posting lengths, Facebook Stories in other places and Instagram's disappearing text messages feature.

With large sectors of the economy unable to do business as usual, many marketers have paused or changed media plans. In one potential early sign of the tough times to come for digital advertising, Twitter updated its guidance to investors earlier this week and announced that it expects to see a drop in Q1 2020 revenues, on a year-over-year basis, due to the coronavirus pandemic.

With the ever-changing situation surrounding the coronavirus outbreak, it is unclear how long the pandemic will last and what its effect on the economy—and therefore the TV industry—will be.

Just months after the first case was reported, it is already clear that COVID-19 is having a negative impact on ad spending in China. In fact, we have lowered our outlook for China ad spending for 2020 and beyond.

eMarketer senior analyst Jasmine Enberg, forecasting analyst Eric Haggstrom and principal analyst Nicole Perrin discuss how COVID-19 could affect ad spending. What do we expect to happen? And what developments might get us to make revisions? They then talk about recent event cancellations, France's record fine of Apple and Starbucks' "to-go" model.

eMarketer senior analyst Jasmine Enberg analyzes the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on eMarketer's worldwide ad spending forecast. She considers supply chain disruptions, the effect of social distancing and the likelihood of a global recession or economic rebound.

With Chile’s GDP growth slashed and retail losses estimated at more than $1.40 billion, none of its major industries—including the digital advertising industry—emerged unscathed by the crippling social unrest this past fall after Santiago Metro’s subway fare hike sparked mass protests about higher costs of living, privatization and widespread inequality.

eMarketer principal analyst Mark Dolliver and senior forecasting analyst Oscar Orozco discuss how digital adoption has made it possible—or not—for people to work, study and entertain themselves from home during the COVID-19 outbreak. Who doesn't use the internet? Do people spend more time watching Netflix or YouTube? And which platforms get the most social media attention? They then talk about Spotify Kids, faster same-day delivery and Sling TV losing customers.

We have downgraded our forecast for total and digital media ad spending in China, but are not making any other major adjustments to our worldwide estimates due to the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak yet.

eMarketer principal analyst Mark Dolliver, junior analyst Blake Droesch and principal analyst Nicole Perrin discuss Facebook’s Pinterest-esque app, virtual sports arena advertising, fines for mobile carriers selling customer location data, ads on top of Ubers, LinkedIn ‘Stories,’ which country has the most islands in the world and more.

As campaigning for the 2020 presidential election heads into its final months, political ad spending will hit an all-time high. The highly partisan political environment is driving more Americans to donate money to their preferred candidates than in past election seasons, which in turn is funneling more money into advertising.

Social ad spending is continuing to rise, and more US marketers—particularly those in retail—will keep funneling money into the channel.