Demographics

On today's episode, we discuss whether augmented reality is the future of marketing, how Clubhouse launching on Android can help the social audio platform grow its user base, how much the pandemic changed boomers' online behavior, whether "buy now, pay later" can move beyond retail, how to help people find something to watch on Netflix, how to swim up in the sky, and more. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer analysts Nina Goetzen and Daniel Keyes, and principal analyst at Insider Intelligence Jeremy Goldman.

On today's episode, we discuss the pandemic challenges that fashion brands are facing, how female digital buyers have changed, and how social media strategies are evolving. We then talk about how engagement with brick-and-mortar retail is changing, how Walmart+ stacks up against Amazon Prime, how significant a problem porch piracy is, and whether in-garage delivery is the solution. Tune in to the discussion with director of marketing and ecommerce at Cloe Raquel Garduño Arroyo, eMarketer director of research Matteo Ceurvels, and analyst at Insider Intelligence Daniel Keyes.

Maybe kids don't need Instagram: That's the claim of more than 40 state attorneys general, privacy advocates, and public health officials—but Instagram is forging ahead regardless.

The Golden Globes will need a new home in 2022: NBCUniversal will not air the show until its committee executes sweeping change to membership numbers and diversity, among other things.

Instagram for Kids: Eroded user trust and heightened regulatory scrutiny are threatening to bury Facebook’s plan for a version of Instagram geared towards children. That could prove disastrous for Facebook’s future growth.

After explosive user growth in 2019 and 2020, TikTok will reach a pivotal milestone with respect to its youngest users. By the end of this year, the video app will have a larger number of Gen Z users in the US than that of Instagram. And it will surpass Snapchat in terms of total users by 2023, according to our latest social user forecast.

“Women hold up half the sky,” former Chinese leader Mao Zedong famously said. More than fifty years on, women in China are doing so online, driving digital trends and fast becoming a cohort that marketers ignore at their peril.

Mobile games to stop targeting ads to kids: Some major developers and ad tech companies will need to stop tracking children under 13 after settling a lawsuit, limiting their targeting abilities.

On today's episode, we discuss some digital audio developments from Spotify and iHeartMedia, how podcast advertising can add value, in-car audio entertainment, and what the first flavor of advertising on social audio platforms will look like. We then talk about what to expect from this years' Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) Podcast Upfronts, how people are approaching podcast moderation, and the market for podcasts created for children. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer forecasting analyst at Insider Intelligence Peter Vahle.

Instagram for kids draws government scrutiny: Two US senators and two US representatives made their skepticism very clear in a statement regarding the company's new plan to roll out an Instagram for kids.

The digital divide has widened, particularly over the past year, and left seniors worldwide in the lurch. This issue takes on added urgency in China, where gender imbalance, delayed marriage, and a declining birthrate only exacerbate the rapid aging of its population. In November, the government urged tech companies to cater to the elderly, and China’s digital giants are now tapping into the so-called silver market.

On today's episode, we discuss Clubhouse's content and competitors, how the pandemic changed social media, the future of social networking, the potential of Instagram Lite, Facebook launching a kids' version of Instagram, some eerily accurate predictions about 2021 from 100 years ago, and more. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer principal analysts Jeremy Goldman and Debra Aho Williamson, and forecasting analyst at Insider Intelligence Peter Vahle.

Once relegated to the children’s market, virtual characters are entering the mainstream in China. Fictional as these digitally rendered avatars may be, they hold real jobs, from pop star to influencer, to even news anchor. And they’re becoming increasingly interactive and humanlike, thanks to improvements in technologies such as AI, motion capture, and virtual reality (VR). Recent advancements in augmented reality (AR), in particular, have enabled virtual avatars to step out of social media and make live appearances alongside flesh-and-blood celebrities.