Sports

iHeartMedia and the NFL want podcast listeners to care about football: The NFL continues to reach for younger consumers, this time with a podcast slate that could help it find potential fans where they already are.

On today's episode, we discuss the new landmark TV (and streaming) rights deal with the NFL, the significance of Amazon's involvement, and what this means for sports viewership in the coming years. We then talk about Roku's new branded content studio, how long marketing videos should be, and the greatest driver of ad-supported video. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer senior analyst at Insider Intelligence Ross Benes.

On today's episode, we discuss the different ways brands might get involved on social audio apps like Clubhouse, what kind of Summer Olympics we can expect this year, common ad tactics that are alienating people, America's payments revolution, how retailers are using Facebook Shops, what we know and don't know about the ocean, and more. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer principal analysts Jeremy Goldman, Nicole Perrin, and Debra Aho Williamson.

Amazon hits a home run with latest sports deal: The platform will stream 21 New York Yankees games this season as it continues its aggressive push for sports content.

The NFL ensures more touchdowns for streamers: A new set of 11-year rights deals will make more football available on streamers, but distribution will remain tied to linear TV for the time being.

On today's episode, we discuss Facebook and Apple's next virtual and augmented reality moves, Netflix cracking down on password sharing, whether Google and Facebook killed the concept of "free," what Americans will do with their stimulus checks, how ESPN+ will do on Hulu, where in the world there is a giant plughole in the ocean, and more. Tune in to listen to the discussion with eMarketer forecasting analyst Rini Mukhopadhyay, senior analyst Sara M. Watson, analyst Blake Droesch, and principal analyst at Insider Intelligence Jeremy Goldman.

On today's episode, we discuss what an out-of-home (OOH) advertising comeback will look like and which areas are driving growth. We also examine how OOH movie theater advertising could recover, the significance of March Madness's return, when people will want to attend sporting events again, and replacing "primetime" with something more personal. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer forecasting analyst Nazmul Islam and senior analyst at Insider Intelligence Ross Benes.

On today's episode, we discuss whether sports are the key to moving viewers from TVs to streaming platforms, if online audiences can ever rival TV viewership, and whether people will want to watch user-generated or professionally made content online. We then talk about the most interesting part of The Walt Disney Co.'s streaming endeavors, how HBO Max stacks up so far, and how this second year of virtual upfronts might be different. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer senior analyst at Insider Intelligence Ross Benes.

Advertisers missed March Madness, too: WarnerMedia and ViacomCBS reported record demand for the tournament with one exec saying, "This is the best year we've ever had."

Streamers battle for sports rights: Media companies are hinting at new plans to use live sports to drive streaming subscriptions, which could grow the audience of sport fans who can be targeted through digital channels.

Dish dives into sports betting: Its DraftKings partnership will offer an integrated experience for satellite TV customers, as both companies jump on the rapidly growing sports betting bandwagon.

eMarketer analyst Blake Droesch, principal analyst Jeremy Goldman, and forecasting analyst at Insider Intelligence Peter Vahle discuss whether the Super Bowl delivered, what's fueling Spotify, how the podcast and social media worlds are blurring together, if reducing politics in the News Feed can help Facebook, why the shopping mall might make a comeback, what is the most relaxing song ever (statistically), and more.

Disney+ hit its subscriber goal four years ahead of schedule: It hit 94.9 million subscribers at the end of last quarter as original content drove viewership in the US and cricket boomed in India.

The not-so super Super Bowl ratings: The game reported about a 5.5% drop in total viewership, but it still draws one of the largest audiences on traditional TV.

Super Bowl streams were lower than expected: Only 20% of homes with a Roku or Chromecast streamed the big game this year, which may come as a surprise given the general consumer shift toward streaming seen during the pandemic.

eMarketer principal analysts Jeremy Goldman and Jillian Ryan, along with junior analyst at Insider Intelligence Blake Droesch, discuss the work-from-anywhere future, how this years' Super Bowl will be unique, why some retailers are skipping returns, Spotify's emotion-based recommendations, what customers want from chatbots, the ideal length of time you should dunk your Oreo in milk, and more.

Earlier this week, Mars Wrigley’s M&M's brand gave fans a sneak peak of its Super Bowl ad via Zoom, its first-ever "virtual" debut. It’s just one of several efforts the company is working on leading up to Sunday’s big game.

eMarketer senior analyst at Insider Intelligence Ross Benes discusses Netflix's Q4 earnings and market position. He then talks about whether lesser-known streaming services can make some noise, YouTube's shoppable videos, and how Peacock's exclusive streaming deal with WWE Network can make its content offering more attractive.

NBCUniversal will sunset NBCSN and add sports to USA Network: The move should help it to bolster an already valuable network and eliminate one that underperforms, as it reimagines what its sports and entertainment slate looks like.