Retail


Last year, the number of locations offering “buy online, pick up in-store” (BOPUS) nearly doubled among leading US grocery retailers. Walmart (and various third-party partners), Target/Shipt, Kroger/Instacart, Ahold and Albertsons brought their collective number of click-and-collect locations from 2,451 in January 2018 to 5,800 in December 2018, per data from CommonSense Robotics.

In 2018, total worldwide app revenues grew 63% year over year, according to app commerce company Poq. Additionally, time spent in shopping apps grew 45% from two years prior, per data from App Annie.

The online grocery market heats up following the news Amazon is planning to open a new line of grocery stores in locations across the US in 2019.

The fashion resale market has grown 21 times faster than the traditional retail market over the past three years, according to a January 2019 report from online resale marketplace thredUP.

While retail ecommerce sales are growing rapidly in the US, brick-and-mortar shopping is still important to consumers. They’ll spend almost 90% of their retail dollars in person this year, and a large portion of that foot traffic comes from webrooming.

Most US consumers expect to get a tax refund this year, and they plan to stick their windfall in the piggy bank.

Pressed for time and money more than in their childless days, today’s parents are increasingly using digital tools to supplement their in-store shopping.

Brands that focus on supply chain sustainability—by showcasing factory conditions, production processes and waste solutions—bode well with young consumers.

In the latest episode of "Behind the Numbers," we sit down with Matt Alexander, co-founder of Neighborhood Goods, which mixes department store concepts and digital native brands. What do D2C brands want from a retail presence? And does the department store format have a future?

In-store charging stations offer a solutions for brick and mortars desperate to stay relevant.

Gen Z is a tough generation for retailers to figure out. They grew up on the internet, but don't like to be targeted with ads there, and crave authenticity in all of their interactions. We parsed the research to help retailers figure it out.

Two-thirds of US shoppers typically start their search for new products on Amazon, according to a March 2019 Feedvisor study that polled respondents who have purchased from the marketplace in the past two years. By contrast, two in 10 respondents use a search engine like Google, and just 3% look to another marketplace.

More than four in five internet users worldwide said a quick and easy checkout was the most valued aspect of the shopping experience, making it the highest ranked response to a January 2019 survey from iVend Retail.

In the latest episode of "Behind the Numbers," eMarketer principal analyst Andrew Lipsman discusses how direct-to-consumer brands find success in creating personal relationships with their customers.

The online grocery market is starting to reach an inflection point, but in order to achieve success, retailers must overcome key logistical hurdles.

Online grocery is a massive and fast-growing market. We estimate that grocery ecommerce in the US—specifically online food and beverage sales—will grow 18.2% to $19.89 billion in 2019 and will rank as the fastest-growing product category online.

Mundane concerns like getting a quality product or service at a good price are still the biggest drivers of brand loyalty for US internet users.

In the latest episode of "Behind the Numbers," eMarketer principal analyst Andrew Lipsman assesses the significance of eBay’s entry into the grocery delivery space.

Amazon retired its Dash button in early March, but the branded device’s end wasn't a failure. We see it as a move to shift more replenishment buying into voice commerce.

Last year, 81.4% of global consumers reported ordering items online for in-store pickup (up nearly 30% from the year prior) as more consumers are drawn to the service’s convenience and speed.