Mobile dethroned TV in 2019 as the channel where US adults spent the most time. While it may be a symbolic threshold for now, it’s still notable that the average US adult spent 3 hours, 43 minutes (3:43) on their mobile devices in 2019, compared with the average 3:35 spent watching TV. As recently as 2016, US adults watched nearly an hour more of TV than they spent on their smartphones and tablets (4:05 vs. 3:08).

eMarketer senior forecasting analyst Oscar Orozco breaks down our adoption estimates for Douyin, the Chinese version of TikTok, and reasons behind its popularity.

eMarketer principal analyst Yory Wurmser discusses one thing that summed up 2019 for him and some of his predictions for 2020, focusing on the promise of 5G.

eMarketer vice president of business development Marissa Coslov explores Facebook adoption in the UK by age group and why the platform is losing teens and young adults.

Marketers have embraced location data for several reasons. It can help personalize experiences for customers, better isolate customer paths to purchase, create better customer segments, and identify opportune moments to target potential clients. But new restrictions on collecting location data will make it more costly for advertisers in 2020.

The first primary contests for the Democratic presidential nomination are not happening until February 2020, but the heat is already on the biggest digital ad sellers to restrict what they allow political and issue-oriented advertisers to do.

We couldn’t have been more correct in late 2018 when we predicted that privacy concerns would snowball in 2019, creating greater challenges for digital marketers with regard to audience identification, targeting and tracking.

While our 2019 prediction of digital’s influence on the reinvention of brick-and-mortar has materialized, it may have also undersold Amazon’s omnipresence in the space. The 800-pound gorilla of retail will continue to cast a wide shadow.

eMarketer principal analyst Mark Dolliver, junior analyst Blake Droesch and vice president of content studio Paul Verna talk about YouTube's harassment policy change, Uber's new security report, TV shows with the most longevity, what people are watching on Disney+, where the bar code came from, and more.

For this update, we look at Instagram's test to remove likes, the launch of Facebook Pay, Twitter's new feature that allows users to hide replies and Snapchat's new longer video ad format, as well as an update on political advertising. It also includes a preview of our latest social network user forecast, which will be discussed in detail in our upcoming social network users report collection, publishing on December 12.

Despite the acceleration of cord-cutting, the demand for TV advertising remains strong. In 2019, that demand was reflected in increased ad prices and a growing appetite for targeted TV ads.

Though social commerce conversions will remain a challenge, the mid-funnel opportunity is growing. Instagram’s continued rollout of shoppable content features is helping brands and influencers spotlight product content and forge a better path to purchase. Pinterest has also introduced features to make it easier for retailers to upload and promote product content. And video-first platforms Snapchat and TikTok are both testing shoppable content features.

The ad tech world may feel targeted (pun intended) by privacy-related scrutiny in the press, but the fees earned by the ecosystem of partners that facilitate programmatic display transactions in the US were up almost 20% this year.

eMarketer principal analyst Nicole Perrin discusses one thing that summed up 2019 for her and some of her predictions for 2020, focusing on the measurability of digital advertising.

eMarketer junior forecasting analyst Nazmul Islam tees up our recently adjusted usage figures for LinkedIn and the factors behind its user increase.

At the end of last year, we asked three important questions about Facebook in 2019.

eMarketer global director of public relations Douglas Clark shares our updated forecast for Netflix adoption in the UK, France and Germany.

For brands and retailers in some categories, Amazon is a significant channel for ecommerce sales. And that often means paying for prime placement on Amazon properties, including in search results. We estimate Amazon will have earned 72% of its $9.85 billion in net US digital ad revenues from search ads in 2019.

eMarketer vice president of business development Marissa Coslov discusses our latest estimates for revenues derived from app installs in the US and growth drivers like Snapchat and TikTok.

Americans are poised to spend $590.67 billion in retail ecommerce in 2019, with a year-over-year growth rate of 12.8%. "To keep growing at double-digit rates, future channel growth will increasingly rely on continued strong gains in the spending rate per buyer," said Andrew Lipsman, eMarketer principal analyst. eMarketer has curated this Roundup of articles, insights and interviews to help you understand the latest trends in the retail industry.